Luminor Blackcomb LB4/LB5-063 Replacement Quartz Sleeve – pack of 4

SKU: RQ-470

£198.95

Replacement Quartz Sleeve For The Luminor Blackcomb LB4/LB5-063 pack of 4 The Luminor Blackcomb replacement quartz sleeve for the LB4/5.RQ-470 is the standard replacement for the Luminor Blackcomb series. The transparent tube will last between 3-5 years dependant on water quality and maintenance. It is advised that when you are... More description

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Replacement Quartz Sleeve For The Luminor Blackcomb LB4/LB5-063 pack of 4

The Luminor Blackcomb replacement quartz sleeve for the LB4/5.RQ-470 is the standard replacement for the Luminor Blackcomb series.

The transparent tube will last between 3-5 years dependant on water quality and maintenance. It is advised that when you are due to change your lamp, you drain the system down andalso check your quartz sleeve for clarity and any cracks etc. Any build-up on the outside cshould be removed with a scouring pad; an alkaline based cleaner can be used for hardened deposits. This will ensure that the newly installed UV lamp works more effectively and help your quartz sleeve to remain unsoiled.

Please note:
The sleeves are fragile and while the glass can be touched, they should be handled with care. Great care should be taken when inserting the new sleeve as the most common cause of breakages in relation to the quartz sleeves are from clients removing and reinserting them on an angle, they will freely break if put under any tension.

Specifications

Model Replacement Quartz Sleeve For The Luminor Blackcomb
SKU RQ-470
Brand Osmio
Filter Parameter No
In Depth Specifications:

Fits UV Model: LB5-063

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