Osmio Flow-Pro Melt Blown 4.5 x 10 inch Sediment Filter

£19.90

Osmio Flow-Pro Melt Blown 4.5 x 10 inch Sediment Filter Cartridge The Osmio Flow-Pro® Polypropylene Melt Blown Cartridges offer exceptional value where depth filtration is required. They are available in a wide range of micron sizes: 1,5,20 and 50 microns. The Osmio 4.5 x 10 Inch Melt Brown Cartridge fits all standard 10″... More description
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Frequently Bought Together

Osmio Flow-Pro Melt Blown 4.5 x 10 inch Sediment Filter + Osmio 4.5 x 10 Inch Full Flow Black Line Housing
Price for both: £87.40

Osmio Flow-Pro Melt Blown 4.5 x 10 inch Sediment Filter Cartridge

The Osmio Flow-Pro® Polypropylene Melt Blown Cartridges offer exceptional value where depth filtration is required. They are available in a wide range of micron sizes: 1,5,20 and 50 microns. The Osmio 4.5 x 10 Inch Melt Brown Cartridge fits all standard 10″ water filter housings.

The filter is a compatible replacement filter for all 10 inch Big Blue filter housings by Culligan, Ametek, Pentek and others use industry standard size 10″ x 4.5″ filters.

The filtrer is highly effective at removing sediments and particles and is suitable for use with bio diesel applications.

Melt Blown 4.5 x 10 inch Sediment Filter Cartridge Features & Benefits-

• Low cost

• Excellent chemical resistance

• Food grade ingredients

• No leachables

• High dirt holding capacity

• Wide range of lengths and micron ratings

 

Typical applications

• Potable water

• Beverages

• Pre-filtration for UV and reverse osmosis equipment

• Fine chemicals

• Electronics

• Plating solutions and more!

ANSI / NSF STANDARD 42 COMPONENT CERTIFIED

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